Within the past few days the FCC has retired its legacy version of the CORES system (COmmission REgistration System)

If you are wondering how and where to conduct online business with the FCC here is some information that may be helpful to you.

A good URL starting point is:   https://apps.fcc.gov/CORES/userLogin.do

That URL will bring you to the new CORES login screen.

If this is your first visit to the new CORES you may wish to begin by watching the CORES TUTORIAL VIDEO.
Other first-time-user options include the HELP or FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS link.
If all else fails, there is a Support Services link and telephone number at the bottom of the screen.

 

At some point you will take the plunge and dive into the CORES system.

You will be shown several options.  Your choice depends on what you may have already done in preparation for this change.
Late in 2021 the FCC announced that the New CORES system had been made active and invited Users to register and begin using the new CORES system.

If you took that advice and created a Username  in the new CORES system then you are in a good position to transact your business with the FCC.
You should be able to provide your Username and Password in the first area and press the LOG IN button. 

If you missed your prior opportunity to register in the new CORES system you will be able to create an account and Username by starting your work under the “Need a Username?” heading.  Press the REGISTER button.

 

For those who are registered in the new CORES system, and who used their Username, Password, and the LOG IN button, you will soon see a screen similar to the one shown below.

If you pressed the REGISTER button please follow whatever instructions are shown there.  Your Editor has already registered and is unable to provide details of what you might see on your screen.

Your Editor selected the link called MANAGE EXISTING FRNs. 
This is where you can pay your FCC transaction fees.  You will need this link at license renewal time and after you take a License Exam.

Your needs may be different.  Try UPDATE USERNAME PROFILE for a Change of Address.

 

Good Luck.

 

 

 

 

Notes From The Shack…

I have come to the realization that while for most new amateur radio operators, the first radio is a HT.  That is great, but too many are encouraged or choose to get a DMR, D-Star, or System Fusion radio as their first.   Then they struggle to get it programmed and use it.  And then become discouraged and leave the wonderful world of amateur radio.

That is sad.

I know money matters.  I know you want to get the “most bang for your buck”.  Why spend $130 or $150 on an Icom V86 or Kenwood TH-K20A handheld, when for a few dollars more you can buy a Yaesu FT70DR dual band with C4FM digital or an Alinco DJ-MD5XTG dual band DMR radio? 

If this is your very first radio, please, do yourself a favor.  Buy the simple analog radio, and use it.   Get the RTS programming software for that radio and use it.  That will get you some experience on the air, give you an idea of what you can accomplish and get you some experience using simple, easy to configure software.

Once you have mastered the analog HT, then move up to the DMR, D-Star or C4FM radio of your choice.  Digital radios have to be programmed.  Many of the DMR radios have their roots in the commercial radio world and CANNOT be programmed from the front panel.

If you are grumbling that a simple Yaesu FT60 is difficult to program, DMR may be a very challenging hurdle.  So before you get frustrated and quit, master the simple!

 

For more information about radios, setting up your station  and another topics, follow the trail to:   
https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

 

** Special Thanks to Vibroplex for hosting the author’s work on their website.  **

It is my pleasure to promote this man’s book.  W2VJN is the former owner of INRAD.
AF3I

Immediately Available for FREE DOWNLOAD

Visit the Vibroplex Website

 

Author’s Comments — by George Cutsogeorge, BSEE W2VJN

Whenever two or more transceivers are used in close proximity there is some
level of interference involved. This level can vary from practically no problem to
actually burning up components in the receiving radio. The purpose of this book
is to identify and quantify the various parameters that create the interference and
to show methods that will reduce or eliminate it.

 

#####

 

It is my pleasure to promote this man’s book.  I learned about promoting books and movies by watching The Tonight Show, Starring Johnny Carson.
He did a great job.  I can only hope to do a fraction of a job.
AF3I

Immediately Available for FREE DOWNLOAD

Visit the K7UA Website

 

Author’s Comments — Bryce K. Anderson, K7UA

This is the second time that I have rewritten the handbook since its
inauguration in 2010. It remains my intention to give new DXers something
that will be easy to understand, yet quickly teach them the basic skills of
successful DXing. Those skills took me years to discover on my own. Now in
hindsight it all seems so simple.

To my pleasant surprise this handbook has gained an international readership
and is now available in several languages! That has been a great honor and I
give my thanks to the many translators who have done that labor.

Wherever you are, I hope that you will enjoy this handbook and that it will help
you gain some new skills. I truly hope that it will give a running start to those
new to our ranks. Nothing would please me more than to learn that I have
helped a new generation of young DXers get started.

Please feel free to email me your feedback or questions. My email address is
listed on QRZ.com.

Best regards,
Bryce Anderson, K7UA

 

Powerwerx Test BUDDY

Looking for a way to keep all the MAGIC SMOKE inside your ham radio gear – where it belongs?

Check out the KNOW-HOW RESOURCES page for information about that red blob in the bottom right corner of the photo.   [Sorry, the photo is not cooperating.  You will not see any red blobs during your visit.]

Click on the SALMAGUNDI link and you will be whisked to the page where the answer and all kinds of helpful information has been uploaded.

Or, simply click on the button below and you will have the document on your screen in seconds with no additional navigation required.  What could be easier than that?

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

How do I Test Buddy [PDF]

 

Helpful Hint for FM Repeater Users

I was listening to a conversation on the Frederick, Maryland W3ICF 146.730 MHz repeater this morning.  The gentlemen I heard shared a helpful hint for those, like me, who were listening.  The hint follows….

There are hams who use the SCAN function of their VHF/UHF transceiver to monitor several repeater frequencies.   Sometimes the ham is in front of the transceiver.  Sometimes the ham is nearby, within hearing distance of the transceiver.

The gentleman I heard on the air mentioned that some hams configure their transceivers to resume scanning a few seconds after the frequency goes quiet.  If you key the repeater and announce yourself, saying something such as:   “This is AF3I, Listening” the other ham, who was out of the room at the time, probably has no idea on which of the several repeater channels you were speaking.

His suggestion:   If you key the repeater and announce that you are listening you may wish to include a few additional words to convey on which repeater or on which frequency it is that you are listening.  For example:   “This is AF3I, Listening on the 146.730 Repeater.”

Sounds good to me.  Give it a try.

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Notes from the shack….

Winter Field Day, 2020

Ah… Field Day.  Summer temps, picnic food, setting up outside… can’t wait!

UH…wait….you said “Winter Field Day?    Huh?  Winter?? as in freezing outside?   Ummm…no thanks.  

Really. Winter Field Day is a thing.,  It was started several years ago as basically a club activity in Ohio and has grown into one of the larger events in amateur radio.  Winter Field Day seems to be most popular from Virginia south.  Why? In part because it’s warmer there.  And in some places Winter Field Day on the 4th weekend in January is a lot more fun to be outdoors than the ARRL Field Day the 4th weekend in June.   The 2020  ARRL Field Day is the weekend of June 27.  CARC has already reserved the cabin at Shaffer Park in Carlisle, PA.  Watch this website for more info.

 

Winter Field Day has essentially the same rules. With one important exception:  the entry classes.   ARRL Field day uses the number of operating transmitters and a combination of how they are powered and where they are located.  CARC has operated ARRL Field Day as 4A (4 radios, club, commercial power).  If we ran our radios  off batteries we could enter as 4B.  Winter Field Day uses the number of transmitters and the environment were they are located:   Outdoor, Indoor or Home.   Outdoor means just that.  Indoor is a room or building without an existing antenna system and not normally used as a space for radios.  Home is a place where you normally have a ham radio station of some sort.  Most of the stations I worked this weekend were Indoor or Outdoor. 

I got the current N3FJP Winter Field Day software downloaded Saturday morning so I could keep my log electronically and was ready to start at 1400 EST (1900 UTC) except that I was just getting up from my nap. So I was a bit late.  I  am a 1 transmiiter Home station, or IH for WFD purposes.   20M was quiet but dead.  40M was busier.  I figured 80M would be really noisy so I started on 40M phone (voice).  I was hoping to pickup the nearby ARRL sections (EPA, WPA, MDC, SNJ, NNJ, WNY, VA, CT, WMA, ONS, ONE, QC and perhaps some others then work longer distances on 80M after dark,  Nope. 40M was long.  My goal is to work a new ARRL section on every QSO until I run out of ones I can realistically get.   I think 3 of my first 5 were Indiana (IN) and the other 2 were I think Ohio (OH) and Illinois (IL).  By supper time I had something like 24 QSOs in the log and the closest were NC and OH.  Not good.  After checking into the Virginia Fone Net on 75m (I could hear the Net Control in Virginia’s Northern Neck, but to check-in I had to rely on a relay in South Carolina, I went down 75m looking for WFD activity.   I found 2 stations.  One I had worked on 40m who moved to 80m after dark and still had a big pile up.  I was surprised at the lack of activity on 80m.  40m had lots of it earlier.  Due to band conditions though many stations I could hear were on top of each other; they could not hear each other and I could hear both but could not reach either without getting stepped on by the other one.  Frustrating!

Got up this morning and found 80m quiet, full of nets and rag chewers and no WFD activity.  20m was very good, but no WFD activity there, so I went back to 40m and worked another 15 stations or so.  Then at 1030 EST my voice  quit.  I was trying to reach a station in KS.  I think he was running QRO (high power) with at least 800 watts, and everyone seemed able to hear him and he heard no one.

Then my voice just quit.  I knew no one would hear me.  

I tried CW, thinking 40m and maybe 20m and 80m would have a fair amount of WFD activity but I found none.  Still not sure what to do, so I shifted my log to my second monitor and fired up FLDIGI, the Fast Light Digital modem software discussed on this website in the “How Do I…” articles featured on the RESOURCES pages.  I went to 40m and switched the mode to PSK31. Found nothing. 

PSK31 is fun.  I like it, but since the advent of the WSJT-X modes (FT65, JT8, FT8) etc, it has become very hard to find on the air.  Many of the call signs I worked on PSK31 I have since worked on FT8.  I started calling CQ WFD on PSK31 and after a few calls someone came back to me.   I collected a couple more, then began seeing other folks calling CQ WFD and worked some of them.  I expected it would be a slow process.  I eventually switched to 20m on 14.070 MHZ then back to 7.070 MHZ to end the contest. I lost a few Q’s as band conditions just blew them away mid contact.  I finished with 12 and added at least 2 new sections in the process. 

The end result was about double my total QSO’s for last year’s Winter Field Day and close to 4 times last year’s score. (Multipliers are your friends!).  Last year I worked I think 2 bands, all on phone.  This year I had 3 bands, and both phone and digital. I figure I left about 11 sections on the table as I was unable to find a band short enough to work them.

 

If Winter Field Day is kinda like the NASCAR race at Daytona, the contest season is just starting.  Next weekend (February 1 and 2) is the British Columbia QSO Party as well as the Minnesota Party and Vermont’s.

South Carolina is February 29 and North Carolina is on March 1, 2020.

The Oklahoma QSO Party is March 14.

The Virginia QSO Party is March 21.

The Pennsylvania QSO Party is October 10 and 11, 2020.  CARC plans to set up and operate a multi operator station somewhere again this year.  Watch this website. We have not decided yet if we will try for a three peat from York County or take the Traveling Radio Road Show caravan elsewhere this year.

Frank

KB3PQT

It was a dark and stormy night.

We’ve all heard that opening line at one time or another.  Here is the Summertime-In-Central-Pennsylvania version of the same concept:   

It was a hot and humid afternoon.

One of the creative writers, who is a vertebrae in the backbone of our club, spent this hot and humid July afternoon writing an article for our Resources page.  The article describes how Ham Radio Operators use the terms WAVELENGTH and FREQUENCY BAND to describe the location of their radio signals.  I hope you will read and enjoy the fruits of his labor.

Here is a link to the article called:  Waves and Bands

Regards,

Andrew Forsyth,  AF3I

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