Field Day Logging

If you are doing Field Day 2022 from home (we understand the whole world cannot do Field Day at Shaffer Park) you will want some logging software.

Most of us use the N3FJP software for Field Day. Current version is 6.63

https://www.n3fjp.com/fieldday.html

If you plan to make fewer than 30 contacts, the Field Day app can be free.  A la carte, this one application is $8.99, or go whole hog and buy the entire N3FJP suite, every program, with upgrades for $59.99  An incredible value.

If you want something completely free the best alternative I know of is the N1MM+ logger.      https://n1mmwp.hamdocs.com/

I used N1MM+ for a few contests and while easy to use, the N3FJP software is just so much easier to set-up.   My contesting style will cause W3SOX and AF3I to scream “no”  but I typically wake up Saturday, cannot find anything better to do, turn the radio on, hear a contest, realize I can probably make a few Qs then I go looking for the software.  By the time that is done, the band has faded out and I didn’t do so well. N3FJP just seems easier to find the right contest software and install it.

While you are at it, the 13 Colonies Special Event is coming (July 1-7, 2022).  The N3FJP Amateur Contact Log easily handles that event.  After you launch AC Log, be sure to click on View >> 13 Colonies for an enhanced tracking tool developed by Scott, Kimberly, and Chris.

The PA QSO Party is coming as well on October 8 and 9, 2022.

For a lot more on computerized logging  and other fun radio stuff, please follow the trail:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

 

 

 

Software can make radio more fun !

When I read that headline my first reaction was — “What?  Software can make radio more fun?”

YES, it is true.

Even a fairly modern ham radio can benefit from software enhancements.  FLRIG from W1HKJ  is part of the time-tested FLDIGI suite of amateur radio software.

 

This application is FREE (Free is good!) at http://sourceforge.net/projects/fldigi/files/

 

Using the simple on-screen controls (even works on a touch screen).you can change VFOs, frequency, band. mode, split, volume, squelch, mic gain, RF power, and others.

The programs run on Apple, Windows and Linux operating systems.  Because this popular software is free and is only used by a few thousand people, your anti-virus software may not like it.  Its fine, just give AVG a minute and it will install.

I found it is easier to set the notch filters, noise reduction, and other radio options using the FLRIG graphical interface than it is to go into the radio menus.

 

For a lot more on FLRIG, FLDIGI and other fun radio stuff, please follow the trail:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

 

 

 

** Special Thanks to Vibroplex for hosting the author’s work on their website.  **

It is my pleasure to promote this man’s book.  W2VJN is the former owner of INRAD.
AF3I

Immediately Available for FREE DOWNLOAD

Visit the Vibroplex Website

 

Author’s Comments — by George Cutsogeorge, BSEE W2VJN

Whenever two or more transceivers are used in close proximity there is some
level of interference involved. This level can vary from practically no problem to
actually burning up components in the receiving radio. The purpose of this book
is to identify and quantify the various parameters that create the interference and
to show methods that will reduce or eliminate it.

 

#####

 

Powerwerx Test BUDDY

Looking for a way to keep all the MAGIC SMOKE inside your ham radio gear – where it belongs?

Check out the KNOW-HOW RESOURCES page for information about that red blob in the bottom right corner of the photo.   [Sorry, the photo is not cooperating.  You will not see any red blobs during your visit.]

Click on the SALMAGUNDI link and you will be whisked to the page where the answer and all kinds of helpful information has been uploaded.

Or, simply click on the button below and you will have the document on your screen in seconds with no additional navigation required.  What could be easier than that?

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

How do I Test Buddy [PDF]

 

It is a great day to learn something new, even if that something happens to be 50 years old… perhaps older.

A new article (in PDF format) has been posted on the Resources page, associated with the sub-heading OPERATING YOUR STATION.  The title of the article is Slow Scan Television.  Hams frequently abbreviate that name to SSTV.

Slow Scan Television is a technology that enables the transmission of images using shortwave radio.  There are some similarities between SSTV and FAX.  Slow Scan Television was created in the 1960s.  At that time there was a tremendous dependency on using cathode ray tubes with very long phosphorescence to display the images.   The more modern version of SSTV leverages the power of the Personal Computer and its Sound Card to create and preserve the images.

You may wish to read the article. Here is a link to the file SSTV.PDF.

We have at least three club members who have taken the bait and tried their hands at sending or receiving SSTV images.  If you have questions on the topic perhaps we can get you connected with one of the three and share their knowledge.

73, Andrew Forsyth   AF3I

#####