Let not your Baefong lead you to temptation!

 Or,  Know the FCC rules!

 On a groups.io that I follow, there was a recent posting about a CSX train crew in New York state.  They were M409, a manifest or “mixed” freight.  They called their dispatcher to ask who was calling them.  All they could hear was a weak transmission ending in “M409”. The dispatcher said he would check and said no one else was around.

A little bit later, the dispatcher was heard telling someone to get off frequency and “go home” and that he would be notifying the police and the FCC.

The speculation is someone had a Baefong U5VR series radio that is old enough, or was illegally modified, so that it could operate on the 155-174 MHz Land Mobile band.

Baefongs seem to be popular “entry level” radios based on their low price.  In 2018 the FCC cited the importer for selling units that did not conform to the FCC Part 90 certification they were granted in 2012.  One of the many issues was they could transmit at 4 watts and regulation limits them to less than 2 watts.

Baefongs are the only DMR radios that seem to have compliance issues, but if you have another brand, do not be tempted to see of if you can transmit outside the amateur frequencies. 

Two Meter radios from Icom, Yaesu and Kenwood are all “locked down” so you cannot transmit on the Land Mobile frequencies even if you have entered and are scanning them.

 

For more information about radios, setting up your station and another topics, please follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.
Frank KB3PQT

 

Within the past few days the FCC has retired its legacy version of the CORES system (COmmission REgistration System)

If you are wondering how and where to conduct online business with the FCC here is some information that may be helpful to you.

A good URL starting point is:   https://apps.fcc.gov/CORES/userLogin.do

That URL will bring you to the new CORES login screen.

If this is your first visit to the new CORES you may wish to begin by watching the CORES TUTORIAL VIDEO.
Other first-time-user options include the HELP or FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS link.
If all else fails, there is a Support Services link and telephone number at the bottom of the screen.

 

At some point you will take the plunge and dive into the CORES system.

You will be shown several options.  Your choice depends on what you may have already done in preparation for this change.
Late in 2021 the FCC announced that the New CORES system had been made active and invited Users to register and begin using the new CORES system.

If you took that advice and created a Username  in the new CORES system then you are in a good position to transact your business with the FCC.
You should be able to provide your Username and Password in the first area and press the LOG IN button. 

If you missed your prior opportunity to register in the new CORES system you will be able to create an account and Username by starting your work under the “Need a Username?” heading.  Press the REGISTER button.

 

For those who are registered in the new CORES system, and who used their Username, Password, and the LOG IN button, you will soon see a screen similar to the one shown below.

If you pressed the REGISTER button please follow whatever instructions are shown there.  Your Editor has already registered and is unable to provide details of what you might see on your screen.

Your Editor selected the link called MANAGE EXISTING FRNs. 
This is where you can pay your FCC transaction fees.  You will need this link at license renewal time and after you take a License Exam.

Your needs may be different.  Try UPDATE USERNAME PROFILE for a Change of Address.

 

Good Luck.

 

 

 

 

This is sort of old news. 

On April 19, 2022, the Federal Communications Commission reduced the fee for a ten year GMRS license to $35 from $70.  At the same time, the previously free, but had to pass an examination, amateur radio license fee went to $35 for ten years.

While I am sure there are people who paid for the GMRS license because that was “easier than studying for and passing a test”, I am sort of surprised at the number of licensed amateurs who are reporting buying the GMRS license now that the cost has come down.

While I think the GMRS service has a lot of value, and I see good reasons for being licensed in both, if you were already licensed as an amateur, and if you only bought the GMRS license because the fee came down, would you please reach out to me at the eMail address shown below and tell me what the appeal is?

President@radioclub-carc.com

 

I have heard from a couple of people saying that they want to explore GMRS.

OK…but are there other reasons?

 

 

For more information about radios, setting up your station  and another topics, follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT