Congratulations to the CARC Multi-Op Team
and CARC Individual Members
who placed in the PA QSO Party 2021 Results

You Rock !
Thank You for your efforts.

#####

Notes from the Shack…

A NEW Technician License Exam question pool has been released!

Have you been studying for your Technician License Exam?  You probably have been reading a Study Guide or a License Manual containing Questions and Answers to help you prepare for the test.

It is important for you to know that there is a new question pool which takes effect JULY 1, 2022.

  • Before July 1, 2022, if you take a Technician License Exam it will use the questions in the CURRENT POOL. If your Study Guide or License Manual covers July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2022 it will have these questions and answers and they will match the Technician License Exam. 
  • As of July 1, 2022 and beyond, the Technician License Exam will use questions selected from the newly released pool!  Some of those questions will be new.  You probably have not yet seen those questions.

 If you are planning to take the Technician License Exam on or after July 1, 2022 you probably want to familiarize yourself with the new question and answer pool.  If you are in the market for a new Study Guide or License Manual look for the effective dates and purchase one that covers July 1, 2022 through June 30, 2026.


 Press Release:

ARLB002 New Technician Question Pool Released, Effective July 1, 2022

The National Conference of Volunteer Examiner Coordinators (NCVEC) Question Pool Committee (QPC) has released the 2022 – 2026 Technician Class FCC Element 2 NCVEC Question Pool Syllabus & Question Pool into the public domain.  It’s available as a Word document or PDF.  The three graphics required for the new Technician question pool are available within the documents, or separately as PDF or JPG files.

The new pool incorporates some significant changes compared to the 2018 – 2022 pool.  Its 257 questions were modified slightly to improve wording or to replace distractors; 51 new questions were generated, and 62 questions were eliminated. This resulted in a reduction of 11 questions, bringing the total number of questions in the pool from 423 to 412. The difficulty level of the questions is now more balanced, and the techniques and practices addressed have been updated.

The new 2022 – 2026 question pool is effective July 1, 2022 through June 30, 2026, and must be used for Technician-class license exams administered on or after July 1, 2022.


For more on the public service, the ARRL, contesting, DXing and other fun radio stuff, follow the trail to:  https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

#####

New Low-Power Limit for ARRL HF Contests Starting January 1, 2022

Effective January 1, 2022, the power output limit for low-power categories has been lowered to 100 watts PEP from the current 150 watts PEP.

With the exception of ARRL Field Day, this change is in effect for all ARRL- sponsored HF contests as well as the IARU World HF Championship.

This change has been implemented to standardize the low-power categories in the contesting community.

Additionally, the previous 150 watt limit is no longer applicable to low power contest categories because most modern HF transceivers only have a power output of 100 watts or less.

#####

 

ARISS Slow Scan Television Transmissions

 

 

The ARISS team will be supporting SSTV operations from the ISS during the period of Sunday December 26 through Friday December 31, 2021.

The images will be related to lunar exploration.

The transmissions should be available worldwide on 145.800 MHz. The planned SSTV mode is PD 120.

 

Planned start and stop times are currently listed as:

Start – December 26 about 18:25 UTC

Stop – December 31 about 17:05 UTC

 

Before the start of this SSTV transmission event begins you will want to review the ISS Pass Predictions for your location.  The pass predictor can be found at the AMSAT website.  

https://www.amsat.org/track/

 

For best results, select satellite passes that cross your sky at a fairly high angle above your horizon.  In the Pass Predictor this is indicated by the Maximum Elevation.  Low elevation numbers are near the horizon and they are unlikely to provide good reception.  Ninety degrees elevation is directly overhead and usually provides the best possible reception.  

 

Amateur Radio Operators and other persons who have fairly modest VHF receiving equipment capable of operating at 145.800 MHz (in the ham radio Two Meter band) have a good chance of hearing the SSTV signals from the International Space Station. 

A typical SSTV image transmission takes about two minutes and is usually followed by one minute of silence.  As the International Space Station orbits the earth it typically will be within range for up to ten minutes as it rises above the horizon, passes across your location, and then sets below the horizon.  A SSTV transmission can be recognized by its unique audio pattern which can be described as warbling or chirpy tones.

 

Individuals who successfully receive and decode an ISS SSTV image are encouraged to save the image to a file and then upload the file to the website mentioned below.  After posting a copy of your image to https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/  you can acquire a special award by going to  https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ and following the directions to receive a  digital copy of your award.

 

The Cumberland Amateur Radio Club usually has several of its members involved in the reception of these ISS SSTV images.

You can learn more about SSTV and image reception by searching our website for keywords ISS and SSTV.

 

Pass Predictions for Grid Square FN10lc Dillsburg, PA

Passes having a Maximum Elevation of 25 degrees or less are not listed.

All dates (Column 1) are in DECEMBER 2021

 

26  No Passes above this location.

 

27  AOS 08:12:05Z  Max Elev 52  LOS 08:22:43Z

27  AOS 14:41:56Z  Max Elev 66  LOS 14:52:51Z

 

28  AOS 07:24:54Z  Max Elev 28  LOS 07:35:18Z

28  AOS 09:01:33Z  Max Elev 32  LOS 09:12:10Z

28  AOS 13:54:30Z  Max Elev 40  LOS 14:05:17Z

 

29  AOS 08:13:55Z  Max Elev 51  LOS 08:24:37Z

29  AOS 13:07:04Z  Max Elev 26  LOS 13:17:35Z

29  AOS 14:43:52Z  Max Elev 38  LOS 14:54:32Z

 

30  AOS 07:26:24Z  Max Elev 86  LOS 07:37:17Z

30  AOS 13:55:23Z  Max Elev 73  LOS 14:06:17Z

 

31  AOS 06:37:58Z  Max Elev 51  LOS 06:48:38Z

31  AOS 13:07:46Z  Max Elev 65  LOS 13:18:40Z

END

 

Doug Stenger on-the-air

Image shows Kate, the host of a popular YouTube channel related to agriculture.

CARC Member operating a radio at a 1978 Field Day event.

International Space Station

 

 

Glossary:

AMSAT — The shorthand name by which the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation is usually known.

 

AOS — Acquisition of Signal.  The earliest possible point in time  during a given pass at which you may begin hearing the transmission.

 

ARISS — Amateur Radio on the International Space Station

 

Azimuth — The position pf a space satellite, measured in degrees of angle along the horizon, relative to North.  North is 0 degrees, East is 90 degrees, South is 180 degrees, and West is 270 degrees.

 

Elevation — The position of a space satellite, measured in degrees of angle above the horizon.  Ninety degrees is directly overhead

 

ISS — International Space Station

 

LOS — Loss of Signal.  The latest possible point in time during a given pass at which you will stop hearing the transmission.

 

PD 120 — A standard that describes and implements the methods of encoding a Slow Scan Television transmission so that it can be transmitted via radio.

 

SSTV — Slow Scan Television.  A method of sending and receiving images via radio.  The images are decoded and displayed using Personal Computer sound card technology and application software.

 

UTC — An acronym for Coordinated Universal Time.  An internationally recognized standard for time keeping.  For most purposes you can use the term Coordinated Universal Time interchangeably with Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

 

END:

 

“Dr. Joe” K3WRY  (SK)

 ARRL Virginia Section Manager Joseph Palsa, K3WRY (SK) 

“Dr. Joe” was #16 on the Virginia Fone Net Roster.   He was a longtime member and since he rarely checked in during the last few years, was treated as visiting royalty when he did.  Dr. Joe was very interested in the public service aspects of amateur radio.  I never knew him well, but he is the kind of person that the hobby needs and leaves very large shoes to fill.

He will be missed.

From ARRL Special Bulletin dated December 12, 2021

Virginia Section Manager Joe Palsa, K3WRY, of North Chesterfield,
Virginia, died on December 7.  An ARRL Life Member, he was 80.

Palsa was appointed Virginia Section Manager in February 2015, and
had since won elections in his own right.  A radio amateur for more
than 50 years, he also served as the Virginia State Government
Liaison.

Palsa held a PhD in electronics technology and was a Life Member of
the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).  He
enjoyed researching and designing ham equipment and building
projects, including some specialized military applications on
electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), electromagnetic interference
(EMI), and electromagnetic pulse (EMP).  His professional experience
included design, product development, and application engineering
support, as well as positions in senior sales and marketing and
senior executive management.

During 2014, he served as president of the Richmond Amateur Radio
Club.  In past years, he has held ARRL Field Organization positions
as Official Bulletin Station (OBS), Official Observer (OO), and
Official Emergency Station (OES).

Active in the Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES), he received
two ARRL public service awards.  Palsa enjoyed DXing, contesting, and
public service communication.

 

For more on the public service, the ARRL, contesting, DXing and other fun radio stuff, follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

Frank M Caldwell, WD5HLO (SK)

A few years ago, I introduced you to a good friend of amateur radio — Frank WD5HLO, #64 on the Virginia Fone Net.  Frank was always travelling with his beagle-basset in the RV or checking in from the orange groves in Florida.

Frank was a retired US Army Lieutenant Colonel.  He was a pilot and loved refurbishing old airplanes.  And, as we know him, he was an avid ham radio operator.  He also worked with electrical engineering students at Virginia Tech. 

His full obituary is at: https://www.marionnelson.com/obituary/franklin-caldwell

He will be missed.

 

For more information on the nets, traffic handling, messaging and other fun radio stuff, follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

Notes from the shack…                

 Field Day 2021

The December 2021 QST has arrived. 
Let’s check the club’s Field day 2021 results.

Aggregate score from eight entries on behalf of Cumberland ARC  was 3,975 points.

The club call, K3IEC, was one of 22 Class 3E entries submitted nationwide and one of two Class 3E entries submitted from the ARRL Eastern Pennsylvania section.. 

This local entry represents the collective efforts of a group of CARC Members who operated three Field Day stations powered by an emergency generator.  The group consisted of eager volunteers who braved the elements to ensure that K3IEC would be on-the-air and logged by other Field Day operations across North America.  Recognition is awarded to members KC3KPD, KB3PQT, K3EYK, N8QVT, W3VRE, KC3SJE, and AF3I for their jobs well-done.  Additional efforts put forth by friends, family, and agency officials brought total participation in the K3IEC operation to twelve.

Incremental support was provided by CARC Members who operated their Home Stations as Class 1D, making Field Day contacts, and submitting logs on behalf of their club. They include:  K3EYK, K3EYL, KB3PQT, N3FWE, W3JJB, WA3KCP, and AF3I.

 

In total, there were 174 entries among all Field Day Operating Classes (A-F) from our ARRL section, Eastern Pennsylvania EPA.

Other ARRL sections demonstrating high levels of participation include:

Ohio                           OH      249 entries

North Carolina         NC      215 entries

Illinois                        IL         197 entries

Virginia                      VA       195 entries

North Texas              NTX    189 entries

So as you can see, EPA was the 6th most active section.

 

For more on the ARRL, Field Day, Contesting  and other fun radio stuff, follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 Bill Somerville, G4WJS  — Silent Key

 From a post by Dr. Joe Taylor K1JT on the WSJT-X groups.io on December 4, 2021.

I am very sorry to convey the sad news that Bill Somerville, G4WJS, died suddenly and unexpectedly a few days ago. He was only about 65 years old.

Bill was a dear friend and very close colleague, though (as is often the case with worldwide ham radio friendships) we had met in person only a few times. In 2013 he was the first to join me in forming a core development group for WSJT-X, which at that time was at program version 0.99. Bill has been closely involved with WSJT-X and related software projects ever since.

Our free, open-source software could not have achieved its extensive worldwide popularity and influence in ham radio without Bill’s essential contributions. In addition to writing code for important portions of the Qt-based user interface for WSJT-X, Bill helped to bring the overall program structure more nearly up to professional standards. Moreover, he devoted countless hours to program support, patiently answering user’s questions on WSJT-related forums.

I have only started to think about the many ways in which I will miss Bill — not to mention how we all will miss his immense and positive impact on WSJT-X and related projects. For more than eight years Bill and I communicated closely and regularly on ham radio topics, sometimes many times per day. Perhaps I will be able to write more about it in the near future. 

Rest in peace, dear friend G4WJS.

               — Joe, K1JT

 

For more on the WSJT-X modes such as FT-8 and FT-4 follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

Phil Kane, K2ASP (SK) 

A sad day.

 I woke up today to emails informing me that one of my internet friends is now a silent key.

Phil Kane K2ASP ex N6SP passed away on November 24, 2021.  Phil was a communications attorney and a professional engineer.  He worked for the Federal Communications Commission then formed his own company.  His company was a consulting firm based on getting the client the best solution, regardless of the vendor.  The company was in business before the 2002 Winter Olympics.  Phil lived in Oregon and passed away just a few weeks after his wife, Roslyn.

I never had the privilege of meeting Phil and do not think he got on the air much.  But I have known him via the ATCS Monitor and Railscan email reflectors for about 20 years.  He was always a great source of knowledge and we had several offline sidebar conversations about the history of various things radio related.

His obituary from the Broadcaster’s Desktop Resource perhaps says it best:

Phil had a both a great sense of humor and a clear understanding of the issues that have consumed much of the FCC he knew. “

Phil Kane Passes Away

He will be missed.

 

For more on the ARRL, FCC regulations and other fun radio stuff, follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

Passing the Torch

After fifteen years of leading the Cumberland Amateur Radio Club to new achievements including the highest membership headcount ever, Andrew Forsyth, AF3I decided to listen to his wife and not run again for the presidency.  Fortunately for our club, Andy is sticking around to maintain the website and other functions where his experience is desired.  

Frank Mellott, KB3PQT has been elected President and Doug Stenger KC3CPT has stepped into the Vice-President’s office.   Garry Fasick K3EYK, Maura Smith-Mitsky KC3SJE and Richard Johnson N3EPY are continuing to serve the club and fill their roles as Treasurer, Secretary and Membership Secretary respectively.  

CARC Club Members — Please see the new monthly column “From the President’s Desk” which appears on a new menu page in the password protected MEMBER AREA of this website.

Or, follow this link:   https://www.RadioClub-CARC.com/from-the-presidents-desk.

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

Notes from the shack…  DMR contesting

 Contesting has been a part of the great wide world of amateur radio since at least 1928 in the US.  Typically contests involve spending hours in the shack on the HF bands (160M, 80M, 40M, 20M, 15M, 10M) and in some contests there will be VHF/UHF activity on 6M, 2M and up. 

Virtually all contests exclude contacts made through repeaters and satellites.    There are some good reasons for those rules.

I had never heard of using DMR in contests until I saw the posting reproduced below.
This appeared on the N3FJP Software Users Group.

You say, “therefore it can’t be counted for any regular 2-way ham radio award”.  Times have changed. There are special events and contests that are allowing VOIP contacts.  Earlier this summer I participated in a 10 day special event from the UK called, “GOTA” – Gateways On The Air.  I used the Allstar network exclusively and logged every contact.  It’s a good thing I did.  I won the International Operator Award for most contacts from bona fide GOTA stations.

There will be more of these types of special events and contests coming as more involve themselves with VOIP.  Contesting and events are not exclusive to RF only.

 

DMR radio has already been adapted by some 3 million users world-wide and seems to be the entry level radio of choice in the US at the moment.  DMR is especially popular in Europe. Like it or not, DMR is changing the hobby.

I have done no research to see which contests are accepting DMR contacts. 

It is amazing that someone like Glenn K3SWZ can devote a weekend to HF contesting and earn 600K points or more. It is even more incredible that a brand new Technician Class licensee can conceivably reach even more places with a simple DMR HT and a hot spot.

For more articles please follow the trail below:
https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

See ‘ya down the log.
Frank KB3PQT

 

Editor’s Note:  Let me say that every operator should read and understand the rules of any contest he or she chooses to enter.  If the rules specifically allow the use of DMR, VOIP, repeaters or similar technologies then you have a “green light” to go ahead and use those technologies in that contest.  Likewise, operators who pursue ham radio awards have a similar obligation to understand and honor the rules as to what constitutes a valid contact.

AF3I — Editor

 

Notes from the shack….

Fun with numbers!

 

The Cumberland Amateur Radio Club (CARC) is a diverse group.

Current Membership Statistics by license class:

 

Advanced 4 11%
Extra 17 45%
General 10 26%
Technician 7 18%

 

The FCC database seems  to only go back to 2000.   Just with that data, the club members have been licensed 482 years.   The actual total is upwards of 1,000 years!

 

One of the fascinating subsets of the hobby is making contacts with different call sign prefixes.   There are awards and contest multipliers based on them.   The club has members with 13 different prefixes:

AF3
K3
K4
KA3
KB3
KC3
KV3
KX3
N3
N8
W3
WA3
WB3

 

Club members call Cumberland, Dauphin, York, and Adams counties home.

 

For more articles please follow the trail below:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

Ham Radio

Training Class

 

 

 

 

* * *    Starting soon    * * *

I heard about a free online training class being sponsored by the Cuyahoga Falls Amateur Radio Club in Ohio.  They will be running a Technician License class on Sundays beginning on October 10, 2021 and continuing for six weeks through Sunday November 14, 2021.  Each class will begin at 1:30 p.m. and end at 4:00 p.m.

The same group mentioned its intent to conduct a training class for the General license exam to take place beginning in January 2022.

 

Information about the training class can be found here: http://tiny.cc/beaham

 

Information and contacts for the course are on this worksheet: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16aeX36_MAO6X1Q1R2Q9_lsXlPoUyhvKOpir3e-mmmPM/edit

 

If this ham radio license exam training class is of interest to you please note that the sponsoring group requires PRE-REGISTRATION and expects participants to read their training materials prior to each week’s class.  The links provided above will explain the process.

 

You may find additional information at the club website http://www.cfarc.org

 

In the Harrisburg/Carlisle Pennsylvania local area the Cumberland Amateur Radio Club is at your service to answer questions and share practical knowledge about Amateur Radio… a.k.a. Ham Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

Route 66
on-the-air

Ham Radio
Special Event

This year marks the 22nd year of this great radio event.

Originally started by the Northern Arizona DX Association, it was a way to allow amateur radio operators a fun way to “Relive the Ride.”  They also can relive their own memories of Route 66, and get to celebrate the highway’s rich history in making the U.S. what it is today.

Citrus Belt Amateur Radio Club (CBARC) in San Bernardino, CA took over the event a couple years later and has grown into one of the best special amateur radio events each year.

Amateur Radio Clubs using special 1×1 call signs W6A through W6V operate from cities on or near “The Mother Road” from coast to coast.

Hundreds of operators worldwide aim to contact as many radio operators as possible who would like to take part in this annual event.

 

Begins September 11, 2021 at 0001 UTC.
Ends    September 19, 2021 at 2359 UTC.

Visit the Cumberland Amateur Radio Club THINGS TO-DO page, Calendar View, scroll to those dates, where you will find details of this Special Event.

 

(This post was inspired by www.W6JBT.org)

 

 

Royal Kramer, Amateur Radio Call Sign W3ZIF, recalls the destruction that accompanied Hurricane Diane as it passed through the Pocono Mountains of Northeastern Pennsylvania.  Royal and several colleagues provided emergency communications support to the towns on each side of the Delaware River near Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania after their telephone lines were washed away in the floods.

In addition to this firsthand recollection provided by a man who was there, you may be interested in reading the book DEVASTATION ON THE DELAWARE — Images of the Deadly Flood of 1955, written by Mary A. Shafer.


I’m quite sure that many of you older folks will remember this day 66 years ago. It was on August 18, 1955, a Thursday night, when Hurricane Diane devastated the Pocono Mountains following Hurricane Connie a few days prior with high winds and heavy rains followed by heavy rains and flooding from Hurricane Diane.

I was in Philadelphia that day and had a difficult time getting home by bus that night since many of the roads into the Lehigh Valley were flooded and impassible. Three days later, Sunday, August 21, I received a phone call asking me if I wanted to travel to Stroudsburg with several other ham radio operators to help maintain radio communication between Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg since all of the telephone and power lines were down and there was no communication of any kind between the two boroughs.

I volunteered my services and to make a long story short, we eight men spent the next 30 hours up there manning our radio equipment and maintaining communication. I never forgot that day and never will since we were doing a service to mankind that was not available from any other source but through ours.

Prior to our leaving after being relieved by a group of ham radio operators from the Reading, PA area, the Stroudsburg Fire Chief approached us with tears in his eyes and a look of fatigue, frustration, discouragement and great concern on his face, remarked, “Thank you gentlemen for all that you have done for us. I don’t know what we would have done without your help.”

I don’t know how the other men felt after hearing that statement but to me, those words meant more to me than if he would have handed me a million dollars. I knew he was serious and appreciative for all we have done but to me, for all of the destruction that we had seen, I felt that I did very little in making life easier for many of those dear residents who suffered so much with their loss not only of property and possessions but loved ones who never survived. Close to 100 lives were lost in that flood and destruction of property went into the millions of dollars.

Each year, whenever August 18 comes around, my mind goes back to Stroudsburg, PA and the Pocono Mountains in general are very vivid memories to me of that tragic time in our lives.

— Royal Kramer


#####

 

Today is Tuesday August 3, 2021
The Field Day 2021 Log Entry Submission Deadline passed a week ago on July 27.
In that sense, there is no reason I should not be able to share this information with you.
Enjoy.

 

Each year as part of the ARRL Field Day Operating Event BONUS POINTS are offered for the successful completion of activities that support the spirit of Field Day.  

One of the long-standing Bonus Point activities is the transmission and reception of the W1AW Field Day Bulletin.
The bulletin is transmitted several times, using various transmission modes, during the Field Day Weekend.
Successful reception and transcription of the W1AW Field Day Bulletin can add 100 Bonus Points to your entry.

 

Most of my ham radio colleagues tell me they are unable to copy and transcribe the W1AW Phone Bulletin because the operator talks too fast — faster than a human being can write or type the bulletin text.

Some of my ham radio colleagues tell me they have not yet developed the equipment and software profiles which would enable them to copy and transcribe the Digital Mode Bulletin.

And, a few of my ham radio colleagues tell me they have permitted their Morse Code reception skills to become rusty, thus preventing them from making solid-copy of the CW Bulletin.

 

In the spirit of helping my ham radio colleagues engage in the Field Day Activities they may have been unable to enjoy on the Fourth Full Weekend of June, I am presenting a copy of the W1AW Field Day Bulletin as received at my station.

The 2021 Field Day Bulletin is representative of the type of message that W1AW transmits each year.  If you have been unable to successfully copy a W1AW Field Day Bulletin during previous Field Day events here is your opportunity to discover what you have been missing.

 

ZCZC AX09
QST DE W1AW
SPECIAL BULLETIN 9 ARLX009
FROM ARRL HEADQUARTERS
NEWINGTON CT JUNE 25, 2021
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS

SB SPCL ARL ARLX009
ARLX009 2021 W1AW FIELD DAY BULLETIN

SINCE ITS BEGINNING IN 1933, EACH YEAR ON THE FOURTH FULL WEEKEND IN
JUNE, AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS GATHER TO PARTICIPATE IN ARRL FIELD
DAY. IT IS THE LARGEST HAM RADIO OPERATING EVENT IN NORTH AMERICA.
WITH THE WORLDWIDE PUBLIC ASSEMBLY CHALLENGES OF 2020 BEING RELAXED,
THIS YEAR MANY CLUBS AND GROUPS ARE GATHERING TOGETHER ONCE AGAIN IN
PUBLIC AREAS, WHILE OTHERS ARE OPTING TO OPERATE FROM THEIR HOME
STATIONS AND CONTRIBUTE THEIR SCORES TO THEIR CLUB AGGREGATE TALLY.

WHETHER YOU’RE PARTICIPATING WITH YOUR FELLOW CLUB MEMBERS, OR AT
HOME WITH YOUR FAMILY, FOR MANY HAMS, FIELD DAY IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF
THEIR YEAR.

HOW YOU OPERATE FIELD DAY IS ENTIRELY UP TO YOU, SHOULD YOU CHOOSE
TO OPERATE 80 METER CW, OR PERHAPS 75 METER PHONE, 6 METER OR 2
METER OR 70 CENTIMETER FM, OR MANY OF THE OTHER POPULAR DIGITAL
MODES SUCH AS FT8, MFSK, OR PSK, THERE IS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.

FIELD DAY IS AN OPPORTUNITY TO SHOWCASE YOUR SKILLS TO THE PUBLIC
AND DEMONSTRATE WHAT AMATEUR RADIO IS ALL ABOUT. INTRODUCE A
NEIGHBOR, FRIEND, OR YOUR CHILDREN TO THE HOBBY THAT WE ALL ARE
PASSIONATE ABOUT.

LAST YEAR, WE SHOWED OUR CREATIVITY BY GETTING ON THE AIR FOR FIELD
DAY IN AN ENVIRONMENT THAT WAS UNPRECEDENTED. LET’S CONTINUE TO
DEMONSTRATE OUR VERSATILITY AND SHOW THE PUBLIC HOW AMATEUR RADIO
CAN THRIVE FOR YEARS TO COME. THE 2021 FIELD DAY RESULTS ARTICLE
WILL APPEAR IN DECEMBER’S QST.

GOOD LUCK AND 73.
NNNN

 

#####

 

Is this the end of ham radio as we know it?
Is FM taking over CB radio
?

 Recently, Amateur Radio websites and YouTube channels have been filled  with articles about FCC docket WT 10-119, Petitions for Reconsideration of Part 95 Personal Radio Services Rules.

The Amateur Radio Service, “ham radio” is regulated under Part 97 rules.

The various short range, low power services such as Citizen’s Band (CB) radio and the General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) and Family Radio Service (FRS) are regulated under Part 95.  CB has always been AM, or amplitude modulated.  After acting on a petition from Cobra Electronics, one of the major CB radio manufacturers, Frequency Modulation or FM will now be an option on all 40 CB channels.  The GMRS and FRS services will be allowed to have location data (GPS) transmissions.

 

The Amateur Radio community reaction in some circles seems to be that potential hams will remain with these services as they now have some of the perks and privileges they used to need to become licensed amateurs to obtain.

Others see it as a way to encourage people to not use the amateur 2 meter band (144-148 MHz) as they “can do everything on CB or FRS they used to do on 2 meters”.  This would presumably clear the way for the FCC to reallocate 2 meters to other services.  There was a proposal in Europe to do that and the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) was able to squelch it a couple years ago. 

The actual FCC Fact sheet announcing the changes is not so scary.  It simply allows FM to co-exist with AM on the CB frequencies and allows FRS and GMRS users to transmit GPS data so other members of their party can see where they are.

Not so scary after all.  While it is true that some potential hams do not become licensed because of the FRS and GMRS services; just like CB radio was an entry to the hobby for many, I suspect many kids are introduced to radio via FRS and GMRS and move up to the amateur ranks in the desire to use a “real radio” and “talk further”, among other reasons.

 

For more information about radios, setting up your station  and another topics, follow the trail to

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT