Notes from the shack…  DMR contesting

 Contesting has been a part of the great wide world of amateur radio since at least 1928 in the US.  Typically contests involve spending hours in the shack on the HF bands (160M, 80M, 40M, 20M, 15M, 10M) and in some contests there will be VHF/UHF activity on 6M, 2M and up. 

Virtually all contests exclude contacts made through repeaters and satellites.    There are some good reasons for those rules.

I had never heard of using DMR in contests until I saw the posting reproduced below.
This appeared on the N3FJP Software Users Group.

You say, “therefore it can’t be counted for any regular 2-way ham radio award”.  Times have changed. There are special events and contests that are allowing VOIP contacts.  Earlier this summer I participated in a 10 day special event from the UK called, “GOTA” – Gateways On The Air.  I used the Allstar network exclusively and logged every contact.  It’s a good thing I did.  I won the International Operator Award for most contacts from bona fide GOTA stations.

There will be more of these types of special events and contests coming as more involve themselves with VOIP.  Contesting and events are not exclusive to RF only.

 

DMR radio has already been adapted by some 3 million users world-wide and seems to be the entry level radio of choice in the US at the moment.  DMR is especially popular in Europe. Like it or not, DMR is changing the hobby.

I have done no research to see which contests are accepting DMR contacts. 

It is amazing that someone like Glenn K3SWZ can devote a weekend to HF contesting and earn 600K points or more. It is even more incredible that a brand new Technician Class licensee can conceivably reach even more places with a simple DMR HT and a hot spot.

For more articles please follow the trail below:
https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

See ‘ya down the log.
Frank KB3PQT

 

Editor’s Note:  Let me say that every operator should read and understand the rules of any contest he or she chooses to enter.  If the rules specifically allow the use of DMR, VOIP, repeaters or similar technologies then you have a “green light” to go ahead and use those technologies in that contest.  Likewise, operators who pursue ham radio awards have a similar obligation to understand and honor the rules as to what constitutes a valid contact.

AF3I — Editor

 

Notes from the shack….

Fun with numbers!

 

The Cumberland Amateur Radio Club (CARC) is a diverse group.

Current Membership Statistics by license class:

 

Advanced 4 11%
Extra 17 45%
General 10 26%
Technician 7 18%

 

The FCC database seems  to only go back to 2000.   Just with that data, the club members have been licensed 482 years.   The actual total is upwards of 1,000 years!

 

One of the fascinating subsets of the hobby is making contacts with different call sign prefixes.   There are awards and contest multipliers based on them.   The club has members with 13 different prefixes:

AF3
K3
K4
KA3
KB3
KC3
KV3
KX3
N3
N8
W3
WA3
WB3

 

Club members call Cumberland, Dauphin, York, and Adams counties home.

 

For more articles please follow the trail below:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

Ham Radio

Training Class

 

 

 

 

* * *    Starting soon    * * *

I heard about a free online training class being sponsored by the Cuyahoga Falls Amateur Radio Club in Ohio.  They will be running a Technician License class on Sundays beginning on October 10, 2021 and continuing for six weeks through Sunday November 14, 2021.  Each class will begin at 1:30 p.m. and end at 4:00 p.m.

The same group mentioned its intent to conduct a training class for the General license exam to take place beginning in January 2022.

 

Information about the training class can be found here: http://tiny.cc/beaham

 

Information and contacts for the course are on this worksheet: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16aeX36_MAO6X1Q1R2Q9_lsXlPoUyhvKOpir3e-mmmPM/edit

 

If this ham radio license exam training class is of interest to you please note that the sponsoring group requires PRE-REGISTRATION and expects participants to read their training materials prior to each week’s class.  The links provided above will explain the process.

 

You may find additional information at the club website http://www.cfarc.org

 

In the Harrisburg/Carlisle Pennsylvania local area the Cumberland Amateur Radio Club is at your service to answer questions and share practical knowledge about Amateur Radio… a.k.a. Ham Radio.

 

 

 

 

 

Route 66
on-the-air

Ham Radio
Special Event

This year marks the 22nd year of this great radio event.

Originally started by the Northern Arizona DX Association, it was a way to allow amateur radio operators a fun way to “Relive the Ride.”  They also can relive their own memories of Route 66, and get to celebrate the highway’s rich history in making the U.S. what it is today.

Citrus Belt Amateur Radio Club (CBARC) in San Bernardino, CA took over the event a couple years later and has grown into one of the best special amateur radio events each year.

Amateur Radio Clubs using special 1×1 call signs W6A through W6V operate from cities on or near “The Mother Road” from coast to coast.

Hundreds of operators worldwide aim to contact as many radio operators as possible who would like to take part in this annual event.

 

Begins September 11, 2021 at 0001 UTC.
Ends    September 19, 2021 at 2359 UTC.

Visit the Cumberland Amateur Radio Club THINGS TO-DO page, Calendar View, scroll to those dates, where you will find details of this Special Event.

 

(This post was inspired by www.W6JBT.org)

 

 

Royal Kramer, Amateur Radio Call Sign W3ZIF, recalls the destruction that accompanied Hurricane Diane as it passed through the Pocono Mountains of Northeastern Pennsylvania.  Royal and several colleagues provided emergency communications support to the towns on each side of the Delaware River near Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania after their telephone lines were washed away in the floods.

In addition to this firsthand recollection provided by a man who was there, you may be interested in reading the book DEVASTATION ON THE DELAWARE — Images of the Deadly Flood of 1955, written by Mary A. Shafer.


I’m quite sure that many of you older folks will remember this day 66 years ago. It was on August 18, 1955, a Thursday night, when Hurricane Diane devastated the Pocono Mountains following Hurricane Connie a few days prior with high winds and heavy rains followed by heavy rains and flooding from Hurricane Diane.

I was in Philadelphia that day and had a difficult time getting home by bus that night since many of the roads into the Lehigh Valley were flooded and impassible. Three days later, Sunday, August 21, I received a phone call asking me if I wanted to travel to Stroudsburg with several other ham radio operators to help maintain radio communication between Stroudsburg and East Stroudsburg since all of the telephone and power lines were down and there was no communication of any kind between the two boroughs.

I volunteered my services and to make a long story short, we eight men spent the next 30 hours up there manning our radio equipment and maintaining communication. I never forgot that day and never will since we were doing a service to mankind that was not available from any other source but through ours.

Prior to our leaving after being relieved by a group of ham radio operators from the Reading, PA area, the Stroudsburg Fire Chief approached us with tears in his eyes and a look of fatigue, frustration, discouragement and great concern on his face, remarked, “Thank you gentlemen for all that you have done for us. I don’t know what we would have done without your help.”

I don’t know how the other men felt after hearing that statement but to me, those words meant more to me than if he would have handed me a million dollars. I knew he was serious and appreciative for all we have done but to me, for all of the destruction that we had seen, I felt that I did very little in making life easier for many of those dear residents who suffered so much with their loss not only of property and possessions but loved ones who never survived. Close to 100 lives were lost in that flood and destruction of property went into the millions of dollars.

Each year, whenever August 18 comes around, my mind goes back to Stroudsburg, PA and the Pocono Mountains in general are very vivid memories to me of that tragic time in our lives.

— Royal Kramer


#####

 

Today is Tuesday August 3, 2021
The Field Day 2021 Log Entry Submission Deadline passed a week ago on July 27.
In that sense, there is no reason I should not be able to share this information with you.
Enjoy.

 

Each year as part of the ARRL Field Day Operating Event BONUS POINTS are offered for the successful completion of activities that support the spirit of Field Day.  

One of the long-standing Bonus Point activities is the transmission and reception of the W1AW Field Day Bulletin.
The bulletin is transmitted several times, using various transmission modes, during the Field Day Weekend.
Successful reception and transcription of the W1AW Field Day Bulletin can add 100 Bonus Points to your entry.

 

Most of my ham radio colleagues tell me they are unable to copy and transcribe the W1AW Phone Bulletin because the operator talks too fast — faster than a human being can write or type the bulletin text.

Some of my ham radio colleagues tell me they have not yet developed the equipment and software profiles which would enable them to copy and transcribe the Digital Mode Bulletin.

And, a few of my ham radio colleagues tell me they have permitted their Morse Code reception skills to become rusty, thus preventing them from making solid-copy of the CW Bulletin.

 

In the spirit of helping my ham radio colleagues engage in the Field Day Activities they may have been unable to enjoy on the Fourth Full Weekend of June, I am presenting a copy of the W1AW Field Day Bulletin as received at my station.

The 2021 Field Day Bulletin is representative of the type of message that W1AW transmits each year.  If you have been unable to successfully copy a W1AW Field Day Bulletin during previous Field Day events here is your opportunity to discover what you have been missing.

 

ZCZC AX09
QST DE W1AW
SPECIAL BULLETIN 9 ARLX009
FROM ARRL HEADQUARTERS
NEWINGTON CT JUNE 25, 2021
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS

SB SPCL ARL ARLX009
ARLX009 2021 W1AW FIELD DAY BULLETIN

SINCE ITS BEGINNING IN 1933, EACH YEAR ON THE FOURTH FULL WEEKEND IN
JUNE, AMATEUR RADIO OPERATORS GATHER TO PARTICIPATE IN ARRL FIELD
DAY. IT IS THE LARGEST HAM RADIO OPERATING EVENT IN NORTH AMERICA.
WITH THE WORLDWIDE PUBLIC ASSEMBLY CHALLENGES OF 2020 BEING RELAXED,
THIS YEAR MANY CLUBS AND GROUPS ARE GATHERING TOGETHER ONCE AGAIN IN
PUBLIC AREAS, WHILE OTHERS ARE OPTING TO OPERATE FROM THEIR HOME
STATIONS AND CONTRIBUTE THEIR SCORES TO THEIR CLUB AGGREGATE TALLY.

WHETHER YOU’RE PARTICIPATING WITH YOUR FELLOW CLUB MEMBERS, OR AT
HOME WITH YOUR FAMILY, FOR MANY HAMS, FIELD DAY IS THE HIGHLIGHT OF
THEIR YEAR.

HOW YOU OPERATE FIELD DAY IS ENTIRELY UP TO YOU, SHOULD YOU CHOOSE
TO OPERATE 80 METER CW, OR PERHAPS 75 METER PHONE, 6 METER OR 2
METER OR 70 CENTIMETER FM, OR MANY OF THE OTHER POPULAR DIGITAL
MODES SUCH AS FT8, MFSK, OR PSK, THERE IS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.

FIELD DAY IS AN OPPORTUNITY TO SHOWCASE YOUR SKILLS TO THE PUBLIC
AND DEMONSTRATE WHAT AMATEUR RADIO IS ALL ABOUT. INTRODUCE A
NEIGHBOR, FRIEND, OR YOUR CHILDREN TO THE HOBBY THAT WE ALL ARE
PASSIONATE ABOUT.

LAST YEAR, WE SHOWED OUR CREATIVITY BY GETTING ON THE AIR FOR FIELD
DAY IN AN ENVIRONMENT THAT WAS UNPRECEDENTED. LET’S CONTINUE TO
DEMONSTRATE OUR VERSATILITY AND SHOW THE PUBLIC HOW AMATEUR RADIO
CAN THRIVE FOR YEARS TO COME. THE 2021 FIELD DAY RESULTS ARTICLE
WILL APPEAR IN DECEMBER’S QST.

GOOD LUCK AND 73.
NNNN

 

#####

 

Is this the end of ham radio as we know it?
Is FM taking over CB radio
?

 Recently, Amateur Radio websites and YouTube channels have been filled  with articles about FCC docket WT 10-119, Petitions for Reconsideration of Part 95 Personal Radio Services Rules.

The Amateur Radio Service, “ham radio” is regulated under Part 97 rules.

The various short range, low power services such as Citizen’s Band (CB) radio and the General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) and Family Radio Service (FRS) are regulated under Part 95.  CB has always been AM, or amplitude modulated.  After acting on a petition from Cobra Electronics, one of the major CB radio manufacturers, Frequency Modulation or FM will now be an option on all 40 CB channels.  The GMRS and FRS services will be allowed to have location data (GPS) transmissions.

 

The Amateur Radio community reaction in some circles seems to be that potential hams will remain with these services as they now have some of the perks and privileges they used to need to become licensed amateurs to obtain.

Others see it as a way to encourage people to not use the amateur 2 meter band (144-148 MHz) as they “can do everything on CB or FRS they used to do on 2 meters”.  This would presumably clear the way for the FCC to reallocate 2 meters to other services.  There was a proposal in Europe to do that and the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) was able to squelch it a couple years ago. 

The actual FCC Fact sheet announcing the changes is not so scary.  It simply allows FM to co-exist with AM on the CB frequencies and allows FRS and GMRS users to transmit GPS data so other members of their party can see where they are.

Not so scary after all.  While it is true that some potential hams do not become licensed because of the FRS and GMRS services; just like CB radio was an entry to the hobby for many, I suspect many kids are introduced to radio via FRS and GMRS and move up to the amateur ranks in the desire to use a “real radio” and “talk further”, among other reasons.

 

For more information about radios, setting up your station  and another topics, follow the trail to

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

Ham Radio Outlet
50thAnniversary Contest
Part 2

Ham Radio Outlet, one of the major amateur radio equipment retailers, is celebrating 50 years this year.  That is amazing!

What is even more amazing is they are running a 2nd contest.  Typical amateur radio retailers give away gift certificates, HTs or maybe a 2 meter mobile rig. HRO has gone all in and in partnership with ICOM, is giving away a second vehicle.

Ham Radio Outlet may seem like the “big box store” of amateur radio.   But in the years I have been in the hobby, HRO keeps growing, while other well established stores close.

Shameless plug: I have never had a bad experience with HRO.  They have been known for decades for mailing new licensees a catalog and welcoming them to the hobby.

Entry is limited to licensed amateurs.  No purchase required.

Enter at https://www.hamradio.com through November 29, 2021.

 

Cumberland Amateur Radio Club is here to help you enjoy ham radio. 
For more information about radios, setting up your station and another topics, follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

Notes From The Shack…

I have come to the realization that while for most new amateur radio operators, the first radio is a HT.  That is great, but too many are encouraged or choose to get a DMR, D-Star, or System Fusion radio as their first.   Then they struggle to get it programmed and use it.  And then become discouraged and leave the wonderful world of amateur radio.

That is sad.

I know money matters.  I know you want to get the “most bang for your buck”.  Why spend $130 or $150 on an Icom V86 or Kenwood TH-K20A handheld, when for a few dollars more you can buy a Yaesu FT70DR dual band with C4FM digital or an Alinco DJ-MD5XTG dual band DMR radio? 

If this is your very first radio, please, do yourself a favor.  Buy the simple analog radio, and use it.   Get the RTS programming software for that radio and use it.  That will get you some experience on the air, give you an idea of what you can accomplish and get you some experience using simple, easy to configure software.

Once you have mastered the analog HT, then move up to the DMR, D-Star or C4FM radio of your choice.  Digital radios have to be programmed.  Many of the DMR radios have their roots in the commercial radio world and CANNOT be programmed from the front panel.

If you are grumbling that a simple Yaesu FT60 is difficult to program, DMR may be a very challenging hurdle.  So before you get frustrated and quit, master the simple!

 

For more information about radios, setting up your station  and another topics, follow the trail to:   
https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

 

Field Day 2021
is in the Books

US Representative Scott Perry, Pennsylvania 10th District, meets with Field Day Operators

 

ARRL Field Day for 2021 has ended.  COVID 19 concerns and restrictions prevented the club from meeting at Shaffer Park, but some intrepid Cumberland Amateur Radio Club members ventured to Fred KC3KPD’s home in Dillsburg.

The Honorable Scott Perry, PA 10th District, US House of Representatives, stopped by to observe our Field Day operations and to share his perspective on matters of interest to us, as his constituents.  Congressman Perry seems very attentive to amateur radio operators and antenna restrictions.

 

Club members installed a dipole antenna and operated on the 20, 40 and 80 meter bands using phone, 20 and 40 meter WSJT-X modes digital, passed traffic using 2 meters and HF.  Andrew AF3I took advantage of a well-timed International Space Station pass and conducted a demonstration on receiving SSTV images.

Fred, thank you for hosting our event!

Club Members, other Ham Radio Operators, and Members of the Community pitched-in to help make Field Day 2021 a memorable event.  Thank you all!    They include:

  • Andrew AF3I,
  • Doug KC3CPT,
  • Steve N3FWE,
  • Fred KC3KPD,
  • Frank KB3PQT,
  • Dave W3BJG,
  • Dave W3VRE,
  • Harry K3EYL
  • Valli N8QVT
  • Maura, our about-to-be-licensed Club Secretary

 

For more information about ARRL, N3FJP logging software, contesting, Field Day and other topics, follow the trail to

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

Logging Question…                             

From our friends on the N3FJP groups.io site.

 

The resounding answer, from multiple people was NO!  

You worked it, you logged it.  You may never get a QSL card, but you made the QSO. 

Many operators had been licensed for 20, 30, even 40 years before the ARRL introduced Logbook of The World (LoTW).

Many DX operators are just now getting into LoTW and may take a while to transcribe their paper logs into LoTW. 

Be patient grasshopper, your QSL may come yet!

 

Logbook of the World is a free service, provided by the American Radio Relay League (ARRL).  You do not need to be an ARRL Member to use LoTW.  

But if you are a US-based operator and if you enjoy rapid confirmations of contacts, then join ARRL and “help pay the freight”.  LoTW is the benefit I use the most often.

For more information about ARRL, N3FJP logging software, LoTW and another topics, follow the trail to https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

Q.)  “Do any of you purge your logs of unconfirmed entries after a set amount of time?  

I mean, an unconfirmed entry is not worth much.”

 

A.)  “NO!”

** Special Thanks to Vibroplex for hosting the author’s work on their website.  **

It is my pleasure to promote this man’s book.  W2VJN is the former owner of INRAD.
AF3I

Immediately Available for FREE DOWNLOAD

Visit the Vibroplex Website

 

Author’s Comments — by George Cutsogeorge, BSEE W2VJN

Whenever two or more transceivers are used in close proximity there is some
level of interference involved. This level can vary from practically no problem to
actually burning up components in the receiving radio. The purpose of this book
is to identify and quantify the various parameters that create the interference and
to show methods that will reduce or eliminate it.

 

#####

 

Hamfests Are Back !


When was the last time you attended a Hamfest?

Probably not during 2020.

Well, stuff your wallet with greenbacks, jump in the car, and get on the road to one of these upcoming 2021 Hamfests. 

They are returning this year.

Can any among our audience actually read those thumbnail-sized hamfest posters?

Not me.

Let me help…. use these links which will bring you to our CALENDAR OF EVENTS  where the FULL SIZE images await your arrival.

 

Firecracker Hamfest is for me

I am a BERRYVILLE fan

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

Firecracker Hamfest

Saturday July 3, 2021

Berryville

Hamfest

Sunday August 1, 2021

 

Why Play Radio… 

For many years, I was a member of the Yahoo Groups Sandpatch List.  Sandpatch, named for Sandpatch Mountain and tunnel, is where the Baltimore & Ohio, now CSX, crosses the Alleghenies.  It was built after the world famous Horse Shoe Curve near Altoona, PA where the Pennsylvania Railroad crosses the same mountain chain.  Sandpatch is steeper and has its own horseshoe curve at Mance, PA.

 

Yahoo Groups was a predecessor of groups.io, where you can find the Cumberland Amateur Radio Club group.   The Sandpatch list was fairly small, but one regular poster was Ted from Michigan.  The list went to Facebook as the demise of Yahoo Groups was imminent.  I lost track of the members. 

 

Periodically I like to check on some other amateur radio club websites to see what they are up to and how they compare to our site, maintained by Andy, AF3I.  One of the “peer group” sites is K3SMT, the Somerset County (PA) Amateur Radio Club.  They seem to be an active group and their page has been improved a lot since my last visit.  They have a “Meet Our Members” tab.  There are profiles of some of the members there (sound familiar?)  One of them is Ted from Michigan!  Aka AC8SW!  

 

Thanks to ham radio, Ted and I are back in touch.

 

For more information on the great wide world of amateur radio, follow the trail to:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

To see Ted, AC8SW’s profile on the Somerset Amateur Radio Club site:

http://www.k3smt.org/OurMembers/OurMembers.htm

 

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

“Thanks to ham radio, Ted and I are back in touch.”

Photograph (headshot) of ham radio operator KB3PQT.

Frank, KB3PQT

Rail Fan and
Amateur Radio Operator

 

Why Play Radio… 

 

For about 50 years or so, rail fans have used radio scanners to listen to the railroad frequencies in the land mobile FM portion of the 137-174 MHz band.  The railroad frequencies are right below the National Weather Service 162 MHz frequencies and can be found in the 159 to 161 MHz range.

Because the land mobile band is close to the Amateur Radio two-meter band, and many amateur radio transceivers can receive the Weather Service band, those transceivers are capable of listening in on the land mobile frequencies.  You cannot transmit, but you can listen.

 

The other evening I was at local rail fan spot waiting on a Norfolk Southern heritage unit.   Some other fans arrived.  I have noticed this before, but it was especially obvious that evening.  One of them was using a cell phone and a scanning app.  I do not know which one, but Broadcastify is a common app.  They have receivers and capture the radio traffic and put it on the internet where it can be accessed via an app or website.   There is a time lag as all this happens.  My amateur radio receiver, set to 160.980 MHz FM, would pick up something.  About a minute later the nearby cell phones would begin making noise and we’d hear the same conversation again. 

 

I have spent well over 30 years in pursuit of the perfect “scanner”.  I think I have almost found it…and used it for many years now.  But I am still slightly amused when I see someone rolling in and they sort of look down on this “old guy clinging to his outdated technology”.  Then they are amazed when I hear stuff they have not heard yet.

 

Radio is cool!

 

For more articles on two-meters amateur radio, railroad frequency lists, and related topics follow the trail to

 

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

Explore the content behind the GENERAL INTEREST TOPICS heading.

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

“… I am still slightly amused when I see someone rolling in and they sort of look down on this “old guy clinging to his outdated technology”.  Then they are amazed when I hear stuff they have not heard yet.”

Photograph (headshot) of ham radio operator KB3PQT.

Frank, KB3PQT

Rail Fan and
Amateur Radio Operator

 

It is my pleasure to promote this man’s book.  I learned about promoting books and movies by watching The Tonight Show, Starring Johnny Carson.
He did a great job.  I can only hope to do a fraction of a job.
AF3I

Immediately Available for FREE DOWNLOAD

Visit the K7UA Website

 

Author’s Comments — Bryce K. Anderson, K7UA

This is the second time that I have rewritten the handbook since its
inauguration in 2010. It remains my intention to give new DXers something
that will be easy to understand, yet quickly teach them the basic skills of
successful DXing. Those skills took me years to discover on my own. Now in
hindsight it all seems so simple.

To my pleasant surprise this handbook has gained an international readership
and is now available in several languages! That has been a great honor and I
give my thanks to the many translators who have done that labor.

Wherever you are, I hope that you will enjoy this handbook and that it will help
you gain some new skills. I truly hope that it will give a running start to those
new to our ranks. Nothing would please me more than to learn that I have
helped a new generation of young DXers get started.

Please feel free to email me your feedback or questions. My email address is
listed on QRZ.com.

Best regards,
Bryce Anderson, K7UA

 

Notes From The Shack…

Sometimes you just have to go play outside.  But there is life… so what do you do? 

Operate portable from the porch?

Or, get a good look this crowded setup…

 

Yeah, this little folding tray table is kinda full.  And it was Plan C after Plan A and Plan B did not do the job.

 

But with this table and a 1/4 wave Two-Meter mag-mount antenna stuck on the car, we passed message traffic between KB3PQT and AF3I on two-meters FM Simplex using Domino EX and BPSK31.  

That’s 12-15 miles as the crow flies.

 

For more articles on two-meters, digital modes and portable operations, please follow the trail below:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

Fun with N3FJP software – An Update!

A few months ago, I shared some data that I had extracted from my N3FJP Amateur Call Log.

At that time about 41% of my lifetime QSOs were on 80 meters. 

In an effort to use more of the amateur radio spectrum, and to explore some of the other amateur bands, I tried a new approach — “Anything but 80”.

 

How did that go?

 

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

(Number of QSOs by Band)

Band     CW       Phone          Dig         Total          %

——-       —-        ——-             —-          ——            —

   160          0                9           25             34            1

     80          0        1,279         186        1,465         39

     40          0           209         223           432         11

     30          0                0           82             82            2

     20          0             55         110           165            4

     17          0                8              6             14            0

     15          0                4           24             28            1

     12          0                1              0                1            0

     10          0           103              2           105            3

        6          0                2              0                2            0

        2          0        1,454              5        1,459         39

——- —   —–              —         —–              —

Total          0        3,124         659        3,787       100

 

  • Total QSOs went up about 400 since last October (2020).
  • 80 meters has slid to 39% of the total.
  • Thanks to robust activity on the Sunday Night 2 Meter net (146.490 MHz FM simplex), 2 meters went up to 39%.
  • 40 meters actually lost 2%.  If this was the Electoral College, 40M gained contacts, but not as fast as 2M, so 2M gets more votes.
  • I think my next goal is to get over 100 QSOs on 30 meters and over 200 QSOs on 20 meters.
  • 17 meters has been “okay” lately, and for some reason I prefer 17 and 30 meters to 20 meters. Not sure why, but I do. 
  • 10, 12 and 15 meters will probably have to wait for improved propagation over the next couple of years.

 

If you would enjoy reading more articles like this please follow the trail below:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT

 

 

• Do you have an interest in DMR radios?

 

• Perhaps you are hesitant to wade into digital radio communications because it seems as if there are so many different “standards”.

• D-STAR, WIRES, FUSION, C4FM — Where do I start?.

• Are you just itching to learn more about a new mode that has revolutionized the Plain-Jane HT?

 

• Have you been put off by new buzz words like CODE PLUGS and TALK GROUPS? 

 

Watch this space!

Do these questions sound familiar?

If so, we have some articles in place that take a 10,000 foot view of the digital landscape.

 

And, over the new few months, the digital world explorers at CARC expect to produce new material about digital amateur radio.

 

For more articles please follow the trail below:

https://www.radioclub-carc.com/resources/

 

See ‘ya down the log.

Frank KB3PQT